Bartók, Tarrega, Mahler

 

The Concertgebouworkest of Amsterdam and Mariss Jansons came to Vienna for two nights at the Musikverein.  Tonight: Bartók’s Second Violin Concerto and Mahler’s First Symphony.

I did not know the Bartók piece before, but very much enjoyed it.  The concerto had a split personality, with phrases alternating between lively and depressed and never quite settling into one or the other, creating an original sound rooted in 1930 rhythms and advanced tonalities.  The soloist, Leonidas Kavakos, handled these mood swings with great ease, with his phrasing coming across lush or light as necessary, and even turning his Stradivarius at times into a gypsy fiddle in a stroke.  The orchestra always provided the appropriate level and mood of support.  In the end, the piece came across as overall positive… but with an edge.  Kavakos followed up with an encore, Tarrega‘s Recuerdos del Alhambra, which clearly sounded like it had been composed for guitar (as it indeed was), allowing Kavakos to demonstrate versatility jumping around to create a full tone.

Mahler can also be schizophrenic, but rather than alternating from phrase to phrase, he tended to demonstrate two sides to every note.  Jansons’ clear and commanding conducting had no gimmicks, and presented this Mahler in a straightforward manner.

In the First Symphony, Mahler presented himself in his most joyful mood, and there was no need to give it too much angst, so Jansons did not.  The Concertgebouw, one of the world’s greatest Mahler orchestras, filled the hall with just enough sound without blowing the roof off.  The first movement began as it should: hushed but firm.  The dance movement sounded as light as a waltz with a sense of foreboding.  The funeral march celebrated the deceased with a wry smile.  And the finale built up a mighty and delicate wall of sound.  Every note contradicted itself while making perfect sense.

The weather in Vienna has given most people the sniffles, but although people hacked away in the lobby, no one dared cough once during this performance.  If the Concertgebouw orchestra’s contained exuberance did not blow the roof off the Musikverein, then at least the applause at the end nearly did.

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