Adams, Beethoven

The local youth orchestra, the Philharmonie Salzburg, took the stage of the Great Festival House this evening, under the baton of its founder Elisabeth Fuchs, for Beethoven‘s always-inspiring Ninth Symphony.

This being Salzburg, the young performers attained a high quality.  Fuchs drove the music forward with passion – something that worked well in the first two movements, but less so in the third (slightly too fast) and fourth (slightly too frantic).  The orchestra could not handle the swells in the music so well, never quite achieving full sound, but was far better in the more restrained moments.  Fuchs presumably knows her orchestra, so restrained a bit more of the music than normal, which certainly added drama but also emphasized the failed swells to a greater extent.  Still, overall, this was a fine performance for such an orchestra, which proved adept even at some of Beethoven’s more crazy junctions.

Soloists Ursula LandmayrChrista RatzenböckMichael Nowak, and Matthias Helm made a wonderful quartet (if not always in time with the orchestra, partly because they were stationed on the front of the stage with their backs to the conductor Fuchs in a poorly-advised failure in blocking), backed up (thankfully from the back of the stage) in fantastic fashion by the Salzburger Bachchor.

The concert opened with On the Transmigration of Souls by John Adams, composed as a commission for the New York Philharmonic’s concert on the first anniversary of the September 11th, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center.  This work contained snippets taken from the missing persons photos placed by the victims’ relatives around New York, overlayed on what was supposed to be mood-setting music.  Whoever came up with this idea (possibly Adams himself) had a good concept, but unfortunately the music was by John Adams, devoid of any value or meaning.  Not offensive, thankfully, but it did not say anything.  This assessment would have been true on its own, but became compounded in juxtaposition with the Beethoven Ninth after the break (according to the program, Beethoven’s Ninth was indeed also the pairing at the world premiere of Adams’ work.)  Yet Beethoven’s was a work of utter genius with everything to say written almost two centuries before Adams wrote his piece, thereby exposing Adams as a vapid fraud.

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