Weinberg, Woodborne

A fantastic chamber concert by the Stadler Quartet in the Mozarteum’s Viennese Hall this evening was not quite the one advertised.  The second violinist got very ill earlier this month – he has recovered, but with a cut in rehearsal time they decided to dispense with a Beethoven quartet and replace it with a trio (scored for violin, viola, and cello).  After that, they just reorganized the concert order completely.  And as much as I love Beethoven, the final result was an even bigger treat.

Moishe Weinberg was one of the greatest composers of the twentieth century – yet remains virtually unknown.  I only discovered him online about four years ago.  His works are almost never programmed – and if I see anything by him in a program, and I can physically get there, then I intend to go.  His String Quartet #8 was already scheduled this evening (what attracted me to the concert in the first place), but his Trio for violin, viola, and cello was the late addition.  The trio (composed in 1950) and the quartet (composed in 1959) made up the first half of the concert.  As an added bonus, the rising star conductor Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla apparently has the same opinion of Weinberg as I do and so she came all the way to Salzburg just for this concert – and was invited on stage to introduce the composer (she apparently discovered him for the first time five years ago – about a year before I did) and announced she will be bringing some of his orchestral works to Salzburg soon.  What a treat that will be.

I have described Weinberg’s sad story before – born  and educated in Warsaw, he fled east when Germany invaded Poland in 1939.  The Germans murdered his entire family.  He got stuck in the Soviet Union (which, allied with Nazi Germany, had invaded Poland from the other direction), married the daughter of Solomon Mikhoels and then the Russians murdered her family.  He himself was purged but saved from execution by the intervention of Dmitri Schostakowitsch, who had become his mentor.  Russian anti-Semitism meant his music was rarely performed even in the Soviet Union, but for those who knew, they knew.

His complex music exists on many levels.  The undertone of the two works this evening was immense sadness.  But above it came dancing and humor and survival.  The techniques varied, keeping the works fresh and evolving, with a lot going on.  These are works worth hearing over and over, and each hearing would reveal something new – of course, I’ve only heard them now once.  The Stadler Quartet indicated it wants to perform all of Weinberg’s seventeen quartets this year alone (the 100th anniversary of his birth comes in December).  I have a lot to look forward to (hopefully they won’t shove all the concerts into October when I am in the US).

After the intermission came the world premiere of the String Quartet #2 – The Eternal Reciprocity of Tears – by South African composer Shane Woodborne.  Woodborne made this quartet a wordless setting of four poems by Wilfred Owen, which Owen composed about his experience in the First World War while convalescing from having been wounded on the front.  After regaining health, he went back to the front where he was killed one week before the end of the war, aged only 25.  Woodborne’s quartet captured the tragedy – and although employing techniques like Weinberg’s dances, these were not happy ones but illustrated the activity and trauma of war.  The Stadler Quartet has probably been practicing this piece the longest (since it was completed last year) and put their hearts into it, suitably raising the dead.  In the audience for the concert, Woodborne also had the opportunity to introduce the work before the performance, and received enthusiastic applause together with the Stadler Quartet at the evening’s end.

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